Sunday, October 25, 2015

Let's Talk "Chanel"

And while we're at it, Let's make fully line a simple jacket, as well!!

In the eyes of my dolls, this post is long overdue. Over the past couple of years, I've fed them their favorite designer in dribs and drabs. A handbag here. A few belts there. But it was in that pair of shoes with the contrasting colored toes that the dollies began tapping their toes as they wait for me to make that ultimate fashion item....the classic Chanel suit. (My Barbies and their 12 inch buddies just love them some Chanel!!!)

The problem has been finding the right fabric. Technically you can use almost any fabric. The house of Chanel is like any other. It puts out a biannual ready to wear collection that bends to current trends and though iconic references like quilting, chain, the camellia flower and boucle fabrics are usually present, there are also prints, leather, satin and any or everything else may be present. The "classic suit" is also defined by a contrasting braid or trim, gold buttons....or none of this. But it is that cream colored boxy jacket worn over a slim skirt made from a nubby fabric and bordered in black trim that my girls demanded. And at long last, I found something that actually works. Admittedly, it is not the easiest fabric. It frays terribly and tends to be unstable with the grain shifting as you cut or work with it. If you are not so lucky to find a fabric like this, consider a raw silk which has tiny micro nubs.

Now, lets get to the real reason for this post. It's a tutorial on how to fully line a jacket, coat or coat dress that opens down the front but doesn't have a lapel that folds out from the neckline. The technique is simple enough, but explaining it is the hard part. I made and lined four garments all in an effort to find an easy and comprehensible way of explaining it to you. And yes, I did make several mistakes because it is easy to lose your way. But once I completely mastered it, I found it to be an incredible (and super professional) way to line simple coats and jackets. However, if you cannot make heads or tails of this post, don't fret. In the next post, I'll be going old school by sewing a lining in by hand.


For the Chanel jacket or coat, the pattern is simple. I used the basic jacket.
If you have not seen that tutorial, I invite you to take a look because, in that post, I also feature a tutorial on how to set in and sew sleeves for doll clothes. It will be important for you to understand what that looks like so that you keep that technique in mind while you work to avoid confusion.

Let's begin. Cut out your pattern pieces in both the fabric and the lining.
1. Attach the front to the back at the shoulders of the fabric. Do the same for the lining.Press the shoulders then set in your sleeves. Be sure to use a running stitch at the top of each sleeve to help you ease into the armholes of your coat.
2.  Right side to right side, lay the lining over the fabric.
3.Pin the hem of the sleeves together,  the hem of the back, and then the hem of the front, up the front edge of the front, around the neck, back down the front edge of the other front panel.
4. Stitch those areas. The side of the front, both sides of both sleeves and both sides of the back will be left open.
5. Add a second row of stitches around the neckline for reinforcement.
6. Then make tiny clips. This will help release tension and aid you when pressing the neckline later.
7. On both front pieces, clip the edges diagonally at each point. This, also helps you to obtain a nice sharp point later.

 8. Take the front panel and slip it through the side openings of the sleeve and back.

9. This front piece will be turned right side out as you slip it through the sides. You will land in between the left side of the jacket back and the far sleeve.

10-11. When you pull this through, immediately identify the sleeve you just pushed through.


12. Find the sleeve and fold in half, right side to right side and pin.


13.Pin all the way down the sleeve lining which will lead you to the fabric sleeve which will lead you to the side of the coat. You may have to maneuver part of the coat as you form this loop. But by starting with the sleeve will help you to stay on track.
 14. Now, take to the sewing machine. You will be stitching in a loop. Sewing down the under arm seam of the sleeve to the underarm seam of the lining and then down the side seam of the lining and up the side seam of the fabric.

15. When you are finished it will look like this.
16. Repeat for the other side of the jacket.

17. While you are stitching the other side, leave a 1-inch (25mm) opening in the lining.
18. When you are finished it will look like this.
19. Now for the magic. Turn your garment right side out by pulling the right side out of the opening you left in the lining.
20. At first your jacket will look like this with the sleeves still inside.
21. Carefully pull out the sleeves.
22. When you see the sleeve lining, your sleeve is completely out. Repeat for the other side.

23. My sleeve board is a pencil wrapped in a piece of cotton sock. I poke this through the sleeve to help straighten it out, then I press down the underarm sleeve with an iron. Then PRESS, PRESS, PRESS.  The one drawback to this technique is that you cannot press the side seams as you put together the jacket. So you will need to really press your seams down as well as the neckline, edges and hem. Use a moistened pressing cloth if you are not using a steam iron.
24. One more thing... slip stich the opening in the lining close.

When you have finished your jacket, the inside will be as lovely as the exterior!


For the "Chanel" coat in the previous post, I made a slight modification to the basic jacket.
I extended the center front by 1/2 inch (22 mm). I then redrew a new V-neck by making a diagonal line from the shoulder down to where I wanted my neckline to fall.

I stitched on tiny buttons to which I added a rhinestone in the middle. The loop fasteners are the same as the thread loops used for hook & eyes featured here.

For the classic "Chanel" inspired suit. Find a fabric that has an irregular or nubby finish. Be aware that these fabrics tend to fray easily and the grain does shift as well. So don't cut anything on the fold and watch your grain lines.

Again, I used the simple jacket pattern. Decide on the length you want. It's line as described above. When finished, I used a 1/8" (3mm) satin ribbon sewing along the edge of the jacket and sleeves.

My patch pocket is simply a 1 inch square (25mm) folded into itself at the edges. A little piece of black ribbon lined the top edge and is glued in the back. Ad a gold stud (or button sticker) just underneath. The skirt is a simple straight, slim skirt featured here. It is fully lined as shown here!

Want the rest of the look? For the handbags, click here. For the belts click here.  To see how we created designer shoes, click here. And of course....the shopping bags are here! Enjoy!

Next up: Easier to comprehend, but more work--hand sewn-in lining for jackets or coats with collars and lapels.


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29 comments:

  1. Wspaniałe ubrania! Dziękuję za tutorial! Będzie na pewno bardzo pomocny!
    Dziewczyny prezentują się wspaniale!
    Pozdrawiam bardzo serdecznie!

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    1. Olla wrote: Great clothes! Thanks for the tutorial ! It will be definitely very helpful!
      The girls present themselves great!
      Yours very sincerely !
      Thank you, Olla. Glad to hear this post could be of some use.

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  2. Hi April, great tutorial! I will try this, but for my large 56 cm (22") dolls, they really need coats and jackets :-). It looks so much better with lining, thank you very much for sharing your technique! Hugs xxx

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    1. Thank you, Linda. And I agree, coats and jackets look so much better with linings. Big hugs.

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  3. PS: I still struggle with putting in sleeves, so maybe I'll start with the lining of a coat without lining the sleeves, I think that is do-able?

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    1. Yes it is do-able. You can opt to not line the sleeves. But maybe you want to wait till next week for my next post because that technique will be easier for you. (If you are having trouble putting in the sleeves even using the dolly version, check to make sure the top of the sleeve is not too high. One more thing. don't forget to do a running stitch around the cap of the sleeve. Draw up that stitch a bit. Press. Then set in the sleeve.)

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    2. Thank you very much April, I will wait for your hand stitching post :-). x

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  4. Thank you April! Now I know why the shoulders and armpits of my jackes are so sloppy!!! I missed the post about how to attach them! LOL
    And the advice you gave Linda is priceless.....My boys and girls will be forever in debt with you for this!

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    1. You know Billa, I was looking closely at your men's suit tutorial and I suddenly realized that you had set in the sleeves the way we do for human clothes. That is really hard (and what I did in the beginning). Sometimes I think you get a slightly better look (particularly the forward curve of the sleeve), but after putting on the jacket and taking it off a few times, the sleeve doesn't always hold up very well. On the other hand, the dolly method is easy are really doesn't take too much away from the hand of the sleeve. What you can do is to make a second row of stitches around the armhole and carefully clip the edges to that it falls a bit better. In any case, this should make the process go faster and easier!

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  5. Ah, bagging the lining. Usually easier to demonstrate in contrasting fabrics - and who the devil wants to wear that result? Certainly not me or your customers.
    I love that you treat this work with the same finishing details as for more bendable and larger clients. Always happy to read every post.

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    1. Ah yes, the lining!!! Though most of what is sold (for humans and, for that matter, dolls) doesn't have linings any more, there are many doll enthusiasts and collectors who insist on lined clothing. A lot of trendy clothes really don't need them, but if you're making a classic garment or a coat or jacket, it does look better when it's lined. And yes, I could have used contrasting colors or even a sketch to demonstrate but I wanted the reader to see how the actual jacket comes alive from start to finish. It's also why the photos are extra large. In any case, thank you for your kind words and for stopping by.

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  6. Hello from Spain: I adore Chanel brand. It Is my favorite clothes. Your creations are impressive. Great pics. Keep in touch

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    1. Thank you, Marta. As I go along, I'm very happy with how my clothes are turned out in these last few posts. See you soon.

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  7. Beautifully constructed and down to the buttons with buttoning loops! Indeed for tiny fairy fingers to make. The two suits really say "Chanel" - O

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    1. Thank you, O. The Chanel inspired suits are so simple, it really forces you to pay more attention to the finishing. That's what separates "the designer brand" from everything else in the market. It takes fairy fingers and LOTS of patience!!!!

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  8. Beautiful, thank you so much for sharing, your site gives me the confidence to try to make the doll clothes. Amazing detail.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Ginger Lola. If my site inspires you to try making the clothes....my work is done!!! LOL!!!

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  9. Bonjour,
    Merci beaucoup pour ces conseils de coutures. J'imagine qu'on peut utiliser la même technique pour faire des vêtements réversibles ??? Je viens tout juste de terminer ma veste réversible. Tous les vêtements que je fais à la main sont dans la section : COUDRE POUR BARBIE sur mon blog. C'est une veste mi-longue points blancs sur fond noir et réversible tout blanc. Je vais peut-être essayé de faire le tailleur Chanel. Mais c'est le tissu le défi je pense. Merci beaucoup pour ce post.

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  10. Tout a fait! If faut, peut-etre couper tout pres des coutures pour etre sur que tout sera plat après avoir faire un bon pressing. Pour le tailleur Chanel, j'ai pris beaucoup de temps en cherchant le bon tissue! Mais peut-etre vous pouvez trouver la soie brute? Il me semble, cela peut server aussi. Je vais regarder votre blog pour voir la veste reversible. Ravi que vous avez trouve quelques choses interessants ici.

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  11. Wow April fabulous tutorial thanks for share,
    i use to lining my jackets as you,with the side open to turn it ;-)
    Both jackets looks a real Channel congrats.
    xx

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  12. Ohh wow that's super nice!
    You explain so well. : >

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    1. Thank you. Glad you found this post useful.

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  13. I love absolutely this! :) However I find it a bit difficult to understand. If you could do this in a YouTube tutorial it may help much more. Would that be possible? Thanks.

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    1. Inasmuch as I'm all alone while making the videos, they take a LOT of time, which is why I haven't made more. Still, I should probably add one from time to time, so as soon as I have a little bit of time, I'll make this project a priority. Thank you so much for your visit.

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    2. That would be great! I really am very impressed w/ you're work on here. I don't have the creativity, or patience lol. You have a lot of talent. Keep up the great stuff! P.s do you have anything on here about making slopers into various patterns? I would love to check it out. Thanks again.

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    3. Absolutely! At the very beginning of this blog I began with how to create basic slopers for the doll. Afterwards I have created basic silhouettes: skirts, tops, jackets. Many of the outfits featured on this blog start with a basic pattern. When I have done something different, I show you how I modified the basic pattern. At the top right hand of this screen you see "Tutorials." Click under slopers or patterns. Enjoy!!!!

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  14. Love this!!! Since you live in Paris, do you ever go to these designer boutiques, such as Chanel and others?

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    1. Oh yes! First of all, I usually walk instead of take public transportation. So a regular trip to the fashion neighborhoods is a necessity. For many years, I also attended both the Haute Couture and the Ready to Wear shows as a journalist for local English language magazines (when they existed). In addition, I also make a point to roam around the various designer corners in both of the major department stores (Au Printemps and Galleries Lafayette). I can't afford any of these clothes, so I usually head over to Zara or H&M for myself.

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